Vegetarian Moroccan stew with butternut squash and chickpeas sings with a medley of vegetables, raisins, and spices. Serve it with whole wheat couscous and a spoonful of Greek yogurt for a filling meatless main dish. 

Overhead view of moroccan stew with butternut squash and chickpeas in a white bowl. It is served with yogurt and couscous.

Made in one pan, Moroccan stew with butternut squash and chickpeas is flavorful, filling, and easy to make. Gently spiced with warm curry and cinnamon, with a bright citrus note, and just a little spicy heat, this stew is memorable. The spices complement a medley of squash, chickpeas, kale, golden raisins, and tomatoes simmered to perfection.

I love the warm flavors of Moroccan dishes, like Moroccan Freekeh Pilaf with Golden Raisins and Apricots, Slow Cooker Moroccan Chicken Thighs, or Moroccan Carrot Noodle Salad with Chickpeas and Walnuts. So good!

Maybe someday we’ll all be able to travel to Morocco and try traditional Moroccan dishes. Just for a sneak preview, enjoy a quick tour of Moroccan dishes from Local Adventurer. Their list of 21 Moroccan Foods You Must Try in Morocco is so interesting with fascinating pictures taken on location. I think I’ll skip the steamed sheep head though. Maybe it’s better than it sounds.

This Moroccan stew with squash and chickpeas will satisfy vegetarians and vegans and most meat lovers will enjoy it as well. It’s loaded with everything that’s good for you! Fill your home with delicious aromas and have everyone running to the kitchen for dinner. 

Table setting with two bowls of vegetarian stew, two glasses of water, a linen and some garnishes.

About this Moroccan stew:

You won’t need special equipment for this easy stew, just a nice big heavy pot or Dutch oven. Get your cutting board and sharp knife out to prepare the vegetables: butternut squash, onions, carrots, celery, garlic, and a big bunch of kale. 

Looking for a shortcut? You can buy already prepped squash in the produce department of the grocery store, especially if you know you’ll be a little short on time. If you’d like to learn how to prep your own squash, and trust me, it’s not difficult, I have a helpful guide for preparing squash that shows how to peel, cut, and cook butternut squash.

Okay, the squash is peeled and cubed. Don’t put away your cutting board and knife yet! Chop the onions, carrots, celery and garlic because they’re next in the pot.

Sauté the veggies until they’re starting to get soft, and then add garlic, curry powder, cinnamon, and red pepper flakes. Stir everything around for a minute or so. Why? Briefly frying spices activates the essential oils in the spices, giving them a brighter taste and aroma.

Now add a bunch of chopped kale. Make sure to remove the tough stems first. Just hold the kale leaf by the bottom of the stem and run your hand up the stem, pulling the leafy part off. Once you’ve accomplished that, roughly chop the kale leaves, making sure you don’t leave really large pieces or strips.

Stir and continue cooking until the kale has wilted, and then add canned tomatoes, vegetable broth, chickpeas, and golden raisins. Simmer the stew for twenty minutes or so. In the meantime, prepare whole wheat couscous or rice, juice an orange, and chop some fresh cilantro to garnish the stew.

Before you serve Moroccan stew, add a squeeze of fresh orange juice, and check the seasonings. Add more salt and pepper if needed. It’s smart to cook with a bit less salt than may be needed. You can always add more salt at the end of the cooking time which is safer than getting too much salt in right away. It’s easy to add salt if necessary but really hard to get it out if your dish turns out too salty.

Serve this warm, flavorful Moroccan stew with couscous, garnished with a spoonful of Greek yogurt and a sprinkling of fresh cilantro. Enjoy!

Close up overhead view of moroccan stew made with butternut squash, chickpeas and more. Served with couscous.

How to make this recipe your own:

  • Serving carnivores? Stir in cooked chicken, beef, lamb, or sausage.
  • Don’t have golden raisins? Substitute regular raisins, chopped dried apricots, or currants.
  • Olive fan? Try adding green olives to this stew.
  • Instead of couscous, serve Moroccan stew with brown or white rice, or quinoa
  • Make it in your slow cooker. Add all the ingredients (except the couscous) to a slow cooker. Stir together to combine, then cover and cook for 4 hours on high, or 7 hours on low. 

Overhead view of squash stew with chickpeas and moroccan spices.

Storage and Reheating Tips

Moroccan stew is really very good leftover. You’ll find yourself looking forward to eating leftovers the next day. I wish I had some in the fridge right now! If you want, you can go ahead and stir leftover couscous right into the leftover stew and store it all in a tightly covered container in the fridge for up to 3 days. Reheat gently in the microwave or on the stove.

Two large white bowls with vegetarian moroccan squash stew with a small bowl of yogurt and fresh cilantro also pictured.

Other great vegetarian recipes:

Whether you always eat vegetarian, or enjoy a meatless meal occasionally, these recipes will satisfy. Try:

 

Two bowls of hearty vegetarian stew served over couscous and garnished with greek yogurt.

Close up overhead view of moroccan stew made with butternut squash, chickpeas and more. Served with couscous.

Moroccan Stew with Butternut Squash and Chickpeas

Yield: 6 servings
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 40 minutes
Total Time: 55 minutes

Vegetarian Moroccan stew with butternut squash and chickpeas sings with a medley of vegetables, raisins, and spices. Serve it with whole wheat couscous and a spoonful of Greek yogurt for a filling meatless main dish. 

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 3 cups cubed butternut squash (½ inch cubes)
  • 1 medium onion, chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 2 carrots, chopped (about 1 cup)
  • 2 stalks celery, chopped) about ¾ cup)
  • 4 cloves garlic, pressed or minced
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • ¼ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ¼ teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 4 cups chopped kale (tough ribs removed)
  • 1 can (28 oz.) diced tomatoes, undrained
  • 3 cups vegetable broth
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 can (15 oz.) chickpeas, rinsed and drained (1 ½ cups)
  • ½ cup golden raisins
  • 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed orange juice
  • Cooked couscous or rice
  • Fresh chopped cilantro and plain Greek yogurt, for serving

Instructions

  1. In a Dutch oven, warm olive oil over medium heat. Add squash, onion, carrots, and celery. Cook 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until onions are translucent and vegetables are softening. 
  2. Add garlic, curry powder, cinnamon, and pepper flakes. Cook, stirring constantly, one minute longer.
  3. Add kale, cook and stir until wilted slightly, about 3 minutes.
  4. Add diced tomatoes, broth, chickpeas and raisins. Season with salt and pepper. Turn heat up and bring mixture to a boil, then partially cover the pan, and simmer at low heat for about 20 minutes.
  5. Remove pot from heat, stir in orange juice. Taste and adjust seasoning. Add additional salt, pepper, or orange juice if desired.
  6. Serve with couscous or rice. Garnish with chopped cilantro and a dollop of yogurt, if desired.

Notes

  • Option: Stir in cooked chicken, beef, lamb, or sausage.
  • Substitute regular raisins, chopped dried apricots, or currants for the golden raisins. Green olives would be good, too.
  • Instead of couscous, serve Moroccan stew with brown or white rice, or quinoa. 
  • Make it in your slow cooker. Add all the ingredients (not couscous) to a slow cooker. Stir together to combine, then cover and cook for 4 hours on high, or 7 hours on low. 

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Nutrition Information:
Yield: 6 Serving Size: 1 of 6
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 254Total Fat: 5gSaturated Fat: 1gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 4gCholesterol: 1mgSodium: 569mgCarbohydrates: 47gFiber: 7gSugar: 15gProtein: 9g

RachelCooks.com sometimes provides nutritional information, but these figures should be considered estimates, as they are not calculated by a registered dietitian. Please consult a medical professional for any specific nutrition, diet, or allergy advice.

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