Serve this gorgeous martini at your next celebration or make one just for you. You’ll discover that a blood orange martini is always welcome.

Two light red martinis on a white tray.

With just the right balance of sweet, tart, and bitter, this blood orange martini is such a bright and happy cocktail. And isn’t it pretty?

Served perfectly chilled, with a stunning slice of dark red blood orange adorning the glass, you will feel celebrated every time you take a sip. Perfect any time of the year, refreshing in the summer and sunny in the winter, don’t wait — try one today!

About this martini

Am I the only one who thinks of James Bond when a martini is mentioned? Probably. I think you’ll love this variation of a classic martini. It’s not difficult to make, it’s fun and beautiful, and even beer drinkers are lured in (thinking of you, Dad!). I’m wishing I had one right now.

As always, the complete and printable recipe can be found on the bottom of this post. Here’s a quick look at how to make a blood orange martini!

What you need

  • Gin: A London dry gin is perfect. Choose your favorite brand.
  • Blood Oranges: These lovely oranges add so beauty and flavor to the martini. You’ll need several: a few to juice (depending on how many martinis you decide to make), and one to slice for garnishing.
  • Cointreau: This orange flavored liqueur is somewhat bitter and adds a lot of depth to the martini. You could also use Triple Sec or Grand Marnier.
  • Lime: Just a squeeze of lime juice is added for a nice tartness.
  • Ice and a Cocktail Shaker: Get ready to shake, shake, shake! Don’t you just love the sound of those ice cubes rattling around in the cocktail shaker? It’s almost happy hour!
Two martinis with bottles of alcohol in the background.

How to make it

It’s pretty simple, really. Add all of the ingredients to a cocktail shaker.

Blood orange juice being poured into a martini glass.

Shake vigorously for fifteen seconds.

Hand shaking a cocktail shaker full of pink liquid.

Strain into a glass (a martini glass if you have it).

Martini being poured from a shaker, through a strainer, into a martini glass.

Garnish with an orange slice, and serve immediately. Cheers!

Overhead view of two blood orange martinis.

FAQ

What does blood orange pair with?

I love this article from Fine Dining Lovers, exploring all the various ways blood oranges can be paired with a wide variety of foods. You’ll be inspired by their ideas.
If you’d like to try another blood orange recipe, I think you’ll love this easy Fish Tacos Recipe with Blood Orange Salsa. It’s so beautiful and totally delicious! Many folks love these Blood Orange and Chocolate Yogurt Popsicles, too.

Are blood oranges edible?

If you’re new to the idea of blood oranges, don’t be put off by the name. Blood oranges are very similar to regular navel oranges in flavor with just subtle differences. The main difference is their color. The outsides vary from orange to a deeper red color. The inside of the fruit is dark pink, even darker than pink or red grapefruit.

What is special about blood oranges?

The color is pretty spectacular and adds so much excitement to this cocktail. The flavor is a bit less tangy than a navel orange, with notes of berry and floral. There are many varieties of blood oranges. One that I see frequently in the grocery store is a raspberry orange. Each variety has a unique flavor but any will do for this cocktail.

Is blood orange the same as grapefruit?

A blood orange may be closer in color to a red grapefruit but the taste is definitely more like an orange.

How to make these martinis your own

  • Use regular oranges or red grapefruit. You may find you need to use a bit of simple syrup if your fruit isn’t quite as sweet.
  • Replace the gin with vodka.
  • Add a half ounce of Aperol if you like a more bitter drink, or a half ounce of Solerno, a blood orange liqueur.

Make Ahead Ideas

While this martini is best served immediately, avoid a last minute squeeze (pun intended) with these helpful hints!

  • Juice the oranges and limes, and store the juice in the refrigerator in a covered jar or measuring cup.
  • Cut orange wedges for garnish and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.
  • Make sure you have plenty of fresh ice, and chill the gin and cointreau, if desired.
  • Polish up your martini glasses and chill those too.
Lime being squeezed into a cocktail shaker.

More cocktail recipes

It’s time to make merry! Shaken, stirred, or blended, these happy hour gems will make your day sparkle. Try:

Blood orange martini on a white tray, garnished with orange wedges.
Two light pinkish red cocktails garnished with blood oranges, on a tray.

Blood Orange Martini

Yield: 1 cocktail
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 5 minutes

Serve this gorgeous martini at your next celebration or make one just for you. You'll discover that a blood orange martini is always welcome.

Ingredients

  • 2 ounces gin
  • 1 ounce blood orange juice (from one orange)
  • ½ ounce Cointreau (or other orange flavored liqueur)
  • ¼ lime, juiced
  • Blood orange slice, for garnish

Instructions

  1. Add gin, blood orange juice, Cointreau, and lime juice to a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake vigorously for 15 seconds.
  2. Strain into a martini glass. Garnish with an orange slice and serve immediately.

Notes

  • Make Ahead: Juice the oranges, and lime and store separately in fridge. Slice an orange for garnishes. Chill the martini glasses.
  • If you like, replace the gin with vodka. Navel oranges or grapefruit could be substituted for the blood oranges.
Nutrition Information:
Yield: 1 Serving Size: 1 cocktail
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 196Total Fat: 0gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 0gCholesterol: 0mgSodium: 1mgCarbohydrates: 9gFiber: 0gSugar: 8gProtein: 0g

RachelCooks.com sometimes provides nutritional information, but these figures should be considered estimates, as they are not calculated by a registered dietitian. Please consult a medical professional for any specific nutrition, diet, or allergy advice.

Did you make this recipe?

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