Buckeyes anyone? I have yet to meet someone who can resist these sweet peanut butter balls dipped in chocolate. They’re just so good!

A pile of buckeyes candy on a plate on a wooden background.

Peanut butter and chocolate, is there a better combination than that? If you like Reese’s Peanut Butter cups, you know what I’m talking about. 

Just a casual search on my site will bring you recipes for Peanut Butter Fudge BrowniesNo Bake Peanut Butter Bars (just like Reeses), Peanut Butter Cup Blondies, and  Peanut Butter Hot Fudge Sauce. Unfortunately my peanut fantasies came to a screeching halt when it was discovered that both of my kids have severe nut allergies. Total bummer!

My mom gladly volunteered her services to test this recipe. Thanks, mom, I know it was a real hardship! I like to think this is the best buckeye recipe but I’ll let you be the judge.

And aren’t these candies kind of cool looking? They look great on a Christmas cookie plate but be prepared with backups because the buckeyes will vanish in a blink of an eye (pun intended).

Buckeyes on parchment paper.

About this buckeyes recipe:

These no-bake treats are easy to make. Involve the family and get some help with the rolling and dipping for a fun shared experience. The reward is a delicious chocolate peanut butter ball!

The process is simple but you’ll need a little extra time for chilling. Once you mix the peanut butter, sugar, and vanilla, that mixture has to chill for 30 minutes before you can shape it into balls.

Peanut butter mixture in a metal bowl.

Once they’re shaped, the 34 little balls have to chill 30 minutes more before dipping. 

Poke a toothpick into a ball and dip the ball into melted chocolate, but don’t submerge it completely. A fork is useful to kind of dislodge the ball from the toothpick back on to parchment paper. You can smooth the hole with your finger or a paring knife so everything’s nice and pretty. Give the chocolate a little time to firm up and they’re ready to eat.

Peanut butter ball being dipped in chocolate.

Why is it called a Buckeye?

You may have thought “buckeyes” referred to the candy’s similarity to the round dark eyes of a male deer. Actually, buckeyes look very similar to and are named for the nut that comes from the buckeye tree. You may know it as a horse chestnut tree or if you live in Great Britain, a conker tree.  

The buckeye tree is Ohio’s state tree and Ohio State University fans will readily recognize the team name Buckeyes, as will their rivals. My husband thought we should rename these candies and I know those are probably fighting words!

Buckeyes on a plate, ingredients in the background.

What’s in this recipe?

  • Creamy peanut butter
  • Butter
  • Pure vanilla extract
  • Powdered sugar
  • Chocolate melting wafers, for dipping

Ingredients needed to make buckeye candy, overhead view.

How to make these your own:

  • Try using chunky peanut butter instead of smooth. Keep in mind, their appearance will be different!
  • Dip the candies in dark chocolate or white chocolate.
  • If you prefer, dip the entire ball into chocolate for a chocolate covered peanut butter ball.

A pile of chocolate and peanut butter candies, the top with a bite removed.

Storage Tips

Once chocolate has fully hardened, store buckeyes in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days or freeze in a freezer bag for up to 3 months.

No-Bake Treats:

These sweet treats don’t have to spend any time in the oven! Try:

 

Buckeyes on a cookie sheet.

Close up view of buckeye candies made with peanut butter and dipped in chocolate.

Buckeyes Recipe (Peanut Butter & Chocolate Perfection)

Yield: 34 buckeyes
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Additional Time: 1 hour
Total Time: 1 hour 30 minutes

Buckeyes anyone? I have yet to meet someone who can resist these sweet peanut butter balls dipped in chocolate. They're just so good!

Ingredients

  • 1 ⅓ cup creamy peanut butter, such as Jif
  • ½ cup salted butter, softened
  • 1 teaspoons vanilla extract
  • 3 ½ cups powdered sugar
  • 3 cups chocolate melting wafers (see note)

Instructions

  1. Add the peanut butter, butter, and vanilla to a large bowl or stand mixer and cream together for 30 seconds. 
  2. Sift the powdered sugar into the bowl and beat until smooth.
  3. Chill the mixture in the refrigerator for 30 minutes.
  4. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. Portion the peanut butter mixture out with a medium cookie scoop and roll into balls. Place them on the cookie sheet and chill in the freezer for 20 to 30 minutes. Do not freeze for more than 30 minutes prior to dipping. Place in the refrigerator if not ready to dip.
  5. Just before removing the balls from the freezer, melt the chocolate melting wafers in a wide bowl or glass in 30-second intervals, stirring between each, until fully melted. Don’t let the balls sit out too long before dipping because they can start to sweat and it will make it hard for the chocolate to stick.
  6. Use a toothpick to spear the balls and dip them in the melted chocolate. Push the balls off the toothpick back onto the parchment paper with a fork. Smooth over the hole from the toothpick with your finger or a paring knife.
  7. Allow to set until the chocolate hardens. Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 7 days or freeze in a freezer bag for up to 3 months.

Notes

  • Jif creamy peanut butter was used in this recipe. Using a natural peanut butter may affect your results.
  • Chocolate chips may be used in place of the melting wafers. Add ½ teaspoon of coconut oil to every cup of chocolate chips for smoothness.
  • There will be excess chocolate remaining since you need to be able to dip these balls almost fully without covering the tops.

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Nutrition Information:
Yield: 34 Serving Size: 1 candy
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 217Total Fat: 13gSaturated Fat: 6gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 6gCholesterol: 11mgSodium: 89mgCarbohydrates: 23gFiber: 1gSugar: 20gProtein: 4g

RachelCooks.com sometimes provides nutritional information, but these figures should be considered estimates, as they are not calculated by a registered dietitian. Please consult a medical professional for any specific nutrition, diet, or allergy advice.

Did you make this recipe?

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